Education Week - September 7, 2016 - 19

" munities are empowered to determine how student-centered learning will work best for them, they often yield the greatest results. Recently, the Nellie Mae Education Foundation released a comprehensive analysis of student-centered approaches and practices in 12 schools across New England. The study examined common class-planning time, professional development, and community partnerships, among other practices, that encourage student-centered approaches and help manage some of the inherent challenges. Above all else, the study illustrated how, with enough time to transition, schools can successfully create their own vision for what student-centered learning looks like, strengthening teaching and learning practices inside and outside the classroom. The transformation of our high schools will not happen overnight. But make no mistake: It will change the face of public education for the better with the help of dedicated teachers, administrators, and communities working together to equip our students with the critical-thinking and 21st-century skills needed to achieve at high levels for the rest of their lives. Our system of public education is not broken-it just serves a different purpose than it did 100 years ago. It is well past time for an upgrade. ■ With enough time to transition, schools can successfully create their own vision for what studentcentered learning looks like." The guidance directs administrators of local education agencies to review data indicating the prevalence and needs of homeless children and youth in each school district. Suggested identification methods include using a questionnaire to gather information about students registering for school in the district, providing ongoing professional development and training for school staff on signs of homelessness, and outreach to community agencies. For the 2017-18 school year, when ESSA goes into full effect, all states will also be required to report on the academic achievement and graduation rates of homeless students. These reports will shine a spotlight on the impact of homelessness and create a baseline from which to assess state and national progress for helping these most vulnerable students. Of course, it's one thing for a law to spell out new responsibilities. It's quite another to make sure that the words on paper transform systems and save lives. To that end, schools can't be the only lifeline for homeless students. Schools need to form diverse partnerships with housing programs, service agencies, faith-based organizations, and businesses. They need to engage leadership from governors, mayors, and other elected officials to raise the profile of student homelessness, recognize its urgency, and prioritize efforts to address it. Some school districts have formed local task forces to bring key stakeholders NICHOLAS C. DONOHUE is the president and CEO of the Nellie Mae Education Foundation, the largest philanthropic organization in New England focused exclusively on education. together, while others haven taken an active role in supporting state and local legislation. As the only universal safety net for homeless children and youth, school participation is essential in local, state, and federal plans to address homelessness. How will we know if these efforts are successful? Initially, the numbers of homeless children and youth identified and reported by public schools should increase. Until we improve the identification of homeless children and youth, we will not be able to provide the support necessary for school access and success. Over the longer term, schools should see improvements in academic outcomes, high school graduation rates, post-secondary access and completion, and employment. Finally, even as educators and policymakers work to implement new requirements to support homeless students, we must accept that the ultimate goal-healthy, productive, housed citizens-is a long-term endeavor. Only then can we start to see the beginning of the true end to student homelessness. If today's homeless students receive the education and the supports they need, their children-the students of tomorrow-may not be homeless. ■ BARBARA DUFFIELD is the director of policy and programs at the National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth, which advocates for federal and state policies and provides technical assistance to school staff to support students who are homeless. Getty system. Once rated in the lowest-performing 20 percent of schools by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, RHS won a High School Gold Award from the National Center for Urban School Transformation in 2014. RHS uses a flipped-classroom approach, in which students watch lectures and lessons at home. This allows them to work more closely with their peers and teachers, and it allows teachers to emphasize interaction and studentdriven dialogue. In just two years, the school has become a national model for equity in education, often hosting site visits for educators and school leaders interested in making this transition. In rural environments, these approaches are helping students who are not on track to graduate. Deer Isle-Stonington High School had the third-highest dropout rate in the state and 133 suspensions in a student population of just 167 during the 2008-09 school year. Located on a small island off the coast of Maine, the community has a maritime economy. School leaders incorporated that economy into the curriculum, providing personalized classes that have direct connections to real-world opportunities for students after graduation. As a result, the school embodies a culture of college and career readiness for all students and has seen a steady graduation rate of 85 percent over the last five years. Revere's flipped classrooms and Deer IsleStonington's local-economy-oriented curriculum are evidence that when schools and com- 'Books, Not Bullets' I By Nita Lowey t's the time of year when more than 50 million American public school students return to the classroom. No doubt, most are looking forward to reuniting with friends after a busy summer, even if they're dreading homework. Every store is stuffed with notebooks, paper, and backpacks, and families are buying new school uniforms in bigger sizes. But these annual rituals elude more than 124 million children and teenagers in nations across the world who don't attend school. As a U.S. representative and the ranking member of the House Appropriations Committee's State and Foreign Operations subcommittee, which oversees foreign aid and humanitarian assistance, I know that an education is the bedrock of our international-development goals- from poverty reduction and economic prosperity to the improvement of health outcomes and community participation. We simply will not make sustained progress if generations of children grow up without basic literacy skills. Access to quality education has been a driving force behind my congressional career. Girls in the developing world face innumerable obstacles to accessing an education, including gender discrimination, societies that do not value their education, poverty, unsafe school environments, and inadequate sanitation facilities. According to the U.S. Agency for International Development, for every year a girl stays in secondary school, her future income increases between 15 percent and 25 percent. Educated women are more than twice as likely to send their children to school, and studies show they are also likely to invest 90 percent of their income in their families and households. An education is also critical to the future success of boys. According to a recent report from the International Labor Organization, the global youth-unemployment rate is expected to reach 13.1 percent in 2016. That is why the United States must aggressively continue efforts to prioritize education access for children around the world. An influential next step would be to pass the proposed Education for All Act, which would develop and implement a strategy to expand access to basic education for children worldwide. My colleague Rep. David Reichert, R-Wash., and I introduced this bipartisan bill in the House earlier this year. This bill was also introduced in the Senate by Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine; Sen. Richard Durbin, D-Ill.; Sen. Ed Markey, D-Mass.; and Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla. This legislation places the United States squarely in a leadership role in pursuit of achieving access to quality education for all children regardless of where they live. By working with foreign governments, nongovernmental organizations, and international groups, we can help nations develop and implement comprehensive, quality programs, address key barriers to school attendance, and increase completion rates for the poorest and most vulnerable children worldwide. Expanding access to quality basic education across the globe will benefit U.S. national and economic security and improve life for our current and future K-12 students. The act, which was approved by the House Foreign Affairs Committee in July, also has the support of 30 nonprofit advocacy organizations across the country. " We simply will not make sustained progress if generations of children grow up without basic literacy skills." Last year, I hosted the extraordinary student Malala Yousafzai and her father on a visit to the U.S. Capitol. After surviving a brutal assassination attempt by a Taliban gunman at the age of 15 simply for going to school, she has become a well-known advocate for girls' education in Pakistan. Her story of courage and perseverance is incredible. Despite the changes to Malala's physical appearance as a result of the attack and the trauma of continued threats from the Taliban, she and her father are crusading to help millions of children who are currently out of school. They are challenging world leaders to invest in "books, not bullets," as she says. Congress should heed Malala's call. For the sake of so many girls like Malala and for so many vulnerable boys, let's pass the Education for All Act and help children around the world realize their dreams by receiving the education they so desperately deserve. Let's blaze the trail for children everywhere. ■ NITA LOWEY is the U.S. representative for New York's 17th congressional district and the ranking Democrat on the House of Representatives' Committee on Appropriations. EDUCATION WEEK | September 7, 2016 | www.edweek.org/go/commentary | 19 http://www.edweek.org/go/commentary

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Education Week - September 7, 2016

Education Week - September 7, 2016
Contents
Are Dual-Enrollment Programs Being Oversold?
Inclusive Classes Have Downsides, Researchers Find
For New Kindergartners, a Whirlwind Introduction
Report Roundup
Tax Boosts to Aid K-12 Up for Vote
News in Brief
Amid Shortage Fears, States Ease Teacher-Licensing Rules
Rating Materials for Reading
Longer Day, Year Required for Many Head Start Programs
DIGITAL DIRECTIONS: Parent Group Sees Education Technology ‘Threats’
Draft ESSA Funding Rules Unveiled
Trump Taps Indiana Lawmaker’s Staffer To Craft Plan on School Choice
Amid School-Closure Worries, Mich. Lists Low-Performers
NICHOLAS C. DONOHUE: Don’t Fix High Schools, Transform Them
BARBARA DUFFIELD: How ESSA May Help Homeless Students
NITA LOWEY: ‘Books, Not Bullets’
Letters
T opSchoolJobs Recruitment Marketplace
ALFIE KOHN: Bullying the Bully
Education Week - September 7, 2016 - Tax Boosts to Aid K-12 Up for Vote
Education Week - September 7, 2016 - 2
Education Week - September 7, 2016 - Contents
Education Week - September 7, 2016 - News in Brief
Education Week - September 7, 2016 - 5
Education Week - September 7, 2016 - Rating Materials for Reading
Education Week - September 7, 2016 - Longer Day, Year Required for Many Head Start Programs
Education Week - September 7, 2016 - DIGITAL DIRECTIONS: Parent Group Sees Education Technology ‘Threats’
Education Week - September 7, 2016 - 9
Education Week - September 7, 2016 - 10
Education Week - September 7, 2016 - 11
Education Week - September 7, 2016 - 12
Education Week - September 7, 2016 - 13
Education Week - September 7, 2016 - 14
Education Week - September 7, 2016 - Trump Taps Indiana Lawmaker’s Staffer To Craft Plan on School Choice
Education Week - September 7, 2016 - Amid School-Closure Worries, Mich. Lists Low-Performers
Education Week - September 7, 2016 - 17
Education Week - September 7, 2016 - BARBARA DUFFIELD: How ESSA May Help Homeless Students
Education Week - September 7, 2016 - NITA LOWEY: ‘Books, Not Bullets’
Education Week - September 7, 2016 - Letters
Education Week - September 7, 2016 - 21
Education Week - September 7, 2016 - T opSchoolJobs Recruitment Marketplace
Education Week - September 7, 2016 - 23
Education Week - September 7, 2016 - ALFIE KOHN: Bullying the Bully
Education Week - September 7, 2016 - CT1
Education Week - September 7, 2016 - CT2
Education Week - September 7, 2016 - CT3
Education Week - September 7, 2016 - CT4
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